I had the wonderful opportunity to spend a weekend with my cousin at our family farm last month in Hemmingford, Quebec.

This farm has been in our family for 5 generations.  My great-great grandfather purchased the land after traveling from Ireland in the mid 1800’s.  Going back those five generations means that the land was purchased before Canada had even become a country!  farmland belonging to the Orr family in Hemmingford, Quebec, CanadaSince the land was purchased from the crown, there have been two farm houses on the property.  One log house that was built early on and the current one that was built over a hundred years ago in 1912.The Orr homestead in Hemmingford, Quebecthe Orr homestead on farm land, Hemmingford, QuebecThere was something indescribable about standing on the land that my grandfather was raised on.  The land that my great-grandfather had worked on.   The land that my great-great grandfather had purchased after traveling the ocean for a better life.picking rhubard on the Orr homestead in Hemmingford, QuebecDuring my time at the farm, I was profoundly aware that I was touching the same things and walking the same land that generations of our family had.

I was touched anew at how deep my love for the past and everything that reminds me of it is.

In the house, I was in awe of the small rooms and their contrast to the excessive space people feel they need today.bedroom-slanted-ceiling-orr-farmhouse-hemmingford-quebecan old farm homestead in Hemmingford, QuebecIn the barns, I was consumed thinking about the blood, sweat and probably tears that must have gone into building them and the work that had happened in them each day.  The same work that provided food for the table and the few treasured possessions they had.the inside of a hundred year old barninside an old barn in Hemmingford, Quebecantique farm tools, QuebecAs I quietly walked around, I was deeply aware of everything my ancestors had done that played apart in shaping the life I have today.  I was humbled to think of all they had endured.The old milk house, Hemmingford, QuebecThey had no idea, that one day, over 175 years later, I would be walking that land thinking of them.
Walking it while filled with gratitude… and awe… and love for all that they had accomplished to better their lives and those of their families.

No wonder I have long felt a connection to things and people of the past.  old painted woodTo things that remind me of farmhouses and hard work and a simpler time.a beautiful chippy barn door, Hemmingford QuebecTo paint this is chipped and worn from the hands that have touched it.

They all represent a lifestyle and work ethic that is rare to see today.
I will forever be thankful to those in my past who had the perseverance to work hard for a better life, while enjoying the simple things that money couldn’t buy.

Linked to:

{Adirondack Girl @ Heart}

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I have 6 lovely thoughts, I would love to hear yours.

  1. Diana says:

    Lovely post, Lisa–I so enjoyed the tour of your family farm 🙂 Loving that amazing aqua door in the last photo! Thanks so much for linking up your posts with us at Vintage Charm —

    • It was a trip I will never forget <3 I am so thankful that I had the opportunity to visit and spend some time there. Thanks so much for stopping by Diana... and I agree that door was gorgeous! It was my favourite 😉

  2. Lisa, this is seriously SO cool! Love, love, love this post, those barns, the doors, the property…what a treasure! hugs, CoCo

    • Thank-you sweet Coco! Isn’t it gorgeous?! I wish I could have spent so much more time there just walking and exploring… the weekend went by all too quickly and was profoundly impacting. There is just something so beautiful about being able to connect to your roots <3

  3. Mary-The Boondocks Blog says:

    Beautiful post Lisa. It brings us back to a time when we tilled the soil. Actually we still have this way of life here in Greece and because of the economic crisis, a lot of young people either leave the country or they go back to the land that they have inherited and start to farm. These traditions should not be lost and we should use the land and not run off to the big cities. Thank you for sharing yo urlovely pictures with us.

    • I can’t only imagine how hard it has been in Greece Mary… it must be quite the shift after the economic crisis. I agree, I think it’s sad too, not matter what country, that all of these traditions are getting lost.

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